Ms. Wejman

October 30th, 2015

Peek at the Week ~ Week of November 2nd

Miss Wejman’s

Peek at the Week

Week of November 2nd-6th

 

Science: Analyzing and interpreting data

The cartographers of fourth grade will continue to create topographic maps. They will make a profile map of Mount Shasta. After creating contour lines of this mountain as cartographers, they will also read about Mount Shasta and learn about John Muir’s original explorations of this site. Through the informational text, they will also be able to identify Mount Shasta as a volcano. From there, the students will watch a video about volcanoes.

 

Math: Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.

On Thursday, the students will take the Unit 2 math test. Concepts that will be assessed include drawing arrays, factors, multiples, finding the area of a rectangle, converting hours to minutes, multiplicative word problems, right angles, properties of quadrilaterals, lines of symmetry, and using a rule in a table. Before we take the test, we will spend the beginning of the week reviewing properties of quadrilaterals, lines of symmetry, and completing “What’s My Rule?” tables.

 

Social Studies: Determine the meaning of general academic-specific words and phrases in a text.

We will begin to learn about our first region of study, the Northeast region. Have your fourth grader identify the states in the northeast state on the United States map. As we are learning about the geography and history of this region, we will be using context clues to identify unfamiliar words.

 

Reading: Describe in depth a character, setting or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (character’s thoughts, words, or actions)

In guided reading groups this week, the students will be using the protagonist’s thoughts, words, and actions to describe him or her with a character trait. At home, ask your child to identify a character trait to describe the protagonist of your fourth grader’s independent book. Every Friday, the fourth grader will be taking a reading comprehension assessment. On Monday, the fourth grader will have the opportunity to make corrections to the test. If the fourth grader correctly explains why the answer is in fact correct, the fourth grader will get a half point added to his or her grade. These tests will be kept at school. If you would like to see each week’s assessment, I would be happy to show you the test. Please let me know!

 

Writing:

With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

After drafting their informational text, the writers of fourth graders are now ready to begin the publishing process. The writers will be compiling their pages into “plastic bag books.” As they are publishing their writing, they will be re-reading their writing to revise ideas and edit errors. To add in the publishing process, they will be discussing the purpose of a good cover, informative back cover, and significance of a copyright/dedication page. We plan to showcase our informational books at our publishing party on November 13th at 845 AM. All are invited! Save the date!

 

Homeside Activity

As you know, the students in Room 207 begin each day with a class meeting. We follow the Caring School Community suggestions for lessons. One component is the home school connection. Each Monday, your child will be given a task to do with an adult at home. It is your child’s responsibility for completing the homeside activity with an adult before Thursday. Every Thursday, we will discuss the responses. This week’s homeside activity involves each student to think of an individual who has made a difference to the child. Please share with your child someone who has made a difference to you. I hope that you enjoy these weekly interviews with your child.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Math Homelink 2.11 Homelink 2.12 Homelink 2.13 Math Homework Due

Math Test

Reading Read for 30 minutes Read for 30 minutes

Letters from North and South America due

Read for 30 minutes

Letters from Europe, Africa, and Asia due

Read for 30 minutes

Letters from Australia and Antarctica due

Read for 30 minutes

 

 

October 23rd, 2015

Peek at the Week ~ Week of October 26th

Miss Wejman’s

Peek at the Week

Week of October 26th-30th

 

Science: Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating important information.

The students will finish their study of fossils by reading the informational text in the science book. As they obtain information, they will be reading to find the main idea of the text. Later in the week, the students will begin Investigation #3, the geologists will use a topographic map to show the shape and elevation of the land. They will end the week, by reading the text as a cartographer (a person who makes maps).

 

Math: Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.

Throughout the week, the fourth graders will be solving word problems. First, we solve word problems involving increments of time. Then, we will be solving multiplication comparison problems. When solving word problems, the students will be encouraged to use the words in the problem to identify the operation needed to be used. At the end of the week, we will be classifying triangles. Every fourth grader should be able to draw a right triangle and identify why it is a right triangle.

 

Social Studies: Determine the main idea of text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

As the students are learning about different regions of the United States, they will be reading to find the main idea. The students will be introduced to a subtitle. From there, they will read to find the main idea of the text. One strategy that is taught to the students is turning the subtitle into a question. This helps the readers have a purpose for what they are reading. Main idea is a difficult skill for the fourth graders. When reading with your fourth grader at home, check in with them about the main idea of what they are reading. For example, focus on a paragraph. Ask your child to identify the main idea of the text.

 

 

Reading: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

Guided reading groups will focus on identifying the theme of the text. They will also be using the plot mountain to summarize the text. The students will be explicitly taught the difference between theme and main idea. Theme is a lesson that we can learn from the events of the text. Main idea is the overall gist of what happened in the text.

 

Writing: Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g. another, for example, also, because)

To help the students begin their sentences in a variety of ways, the fourth graders will revisit the list of transitional words that were used in writing their narratives. The writers will use transitional words that are appropriate in their writing. Ask your fourth grader which transitional words he or she used in his or her writing.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Reading Read for 30 minutes. Read for 30 minutes.

Letters from North America and South America due

Read for 30 minutes. Letters from Europe, Africa, and Asia due Read for 30 minutes.

Letters from Australia and Antarctica due.

Read for 30 minutes
Math Homelink 2.7 Homelink 2.8 Homelink 2.9 Homelink 2.10 Math Homework Due

 

October 16th, 2015

Miss Wejman’s Peek at the Week

Miss Wejman’s

Peek at the Week

Week of October 19th-23rd

 

Science: Planning and carrying out investigations

After learning about how rocks continually are breaking into sediments, the geologist will identify that rocks made out of sediments are called sedimentary rocks. Through learning about sedimentary rocks, they will observe how fossils form. In addition to viewing a video about fossils, they will also model fossil formation.

 

Math: Last week, the students found the factors of a number. This week, they are going to identify the multiples of a given number. By identifying factors and multiples, they will be able to identify numbers as either a prime or composite number. Have your fourth grader identify both a prime and composite number and identify why. On Wednesday, the students will encounter their second problem solving activity of the year. They will use multiplicative reasoning to make a prediction. They will also learn the difference between a conjecture and an argument. The next day, they will revisit the problem and make revisions to their work. Multiple strategies will be discussed.

 

Social Studies: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words.

Throughout the week, the students will use context clues to define the social studies vocabulary. The students will be introduced to regions about how the United States is divided. In addition to learning about cultural, economic, and geographic regions of the United States, they will also be introduced to neighboring countries such as Canada and Mexico.

Reading: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

In guided reading groups, students will be making inferences in the text. As we are progressing in the school year, the fourth graders are becoming more comfortable sharing their thoughts, opinions, and knowledge of the books that they are reading. Ask your fourth grader about his or her guided reading book.

 

Writing: Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

Last week, the students organized their ideas for their expository text with generating outlines. This week, they will use their outline to compose the draft of their expository text. After drafting their writing, they will identify important words about their topic. From there, they will use context clues to define the word for the reader. Ask your fourth grader about the topic he or she is writing about in his or her expository text.

 

Homework Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Reading Read for 30 minutes Read for 30 minutes

Letters from North America and South America due

Read for 30 minutes

Letters from Europe, Africa, and Asia due

Read for 30 minutes

Letters from Australia and Antarctica due

Read for 30 minutes
Math Homelink 2.4 Homelink 2.5 Homelink 2.6 Math Homework Due
October 9th, 2015

Peek at the Week ~ Week of October 12th

Miss Wejman’s

Peek at the Week

Week of October 13th-17th

 

Science: Developing and Using Models

The geologists will continue to use the stream tables to model erosion and deposition. This week, they will observe how slope and flood conditions affect erosion and deposition. From the observation of the land model, they will be able to identify more landforms caused by floods and steeper slopes. Later in the week, the class will generate an inquiry question. From the question, they will work together to make a prediction and set up variables to answer their initial inquiry.

 

Math: Generate and analyze patterns

We will begin Unit 2 by creating arrays of a square number. A square number is a number that can be created with the same number as columns as rows in an array. Ask your fourth grader to identify as many square numbers as he or she can. From creating arrays, they will then work to finding the formula to identify the area of a rectangle. The students should be able to differentiate between area and perimeter. The students will also review the math vocabulary factor and product. Every fourth grader should know that the answer of a multiplication problem is its products. The numbers that it takes to equal the product are its factors.

 

Social Studies: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

As the students read about the American people, government, and economy, they will be identifying the main idea of the text read. In the text, they will focus on a section. After reading the text, they will identify the main idea with three supporting details. Main idea is a difficult skill to master. When reading with your fourth grader at home, ask him or her to identify the main idea of a page of text.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading: Describe in depth a character, setting or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (character’s thoughts, words, or actions)

In guided reading groups, we will focus on the protagonist of the book. The readers will define actions, thoughts, and dialogue that help to describe the character. The students will illustrate these aspects of the protagonist in their Bingo sheet. Ask your fourth grader about his or her protagonist. Questions you can ask are: Would you be friends with the protagonist of your guided reading book? Why or why not? What character trait would you use to describe your protagonist? Why? What does the dialogue in the text say about the protagonist? Is the protagonist of your guided reading book the narrator? What do you know about the thoughts of the narrator?

 

Writing: Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; including formats (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

After a month of narrative writing, we will switch writing genres to focus on the expository genre. We will start the week with generating an expert list to help us give an idea on what we can write about for our expository writing piece. From there, the fourth graders will free write about the “expert topic” to guarantee that they know ample information about the topic. With all of the information about the topic, they will formulate the information into an outline. The teacher will model how to outline information.   To aid in our expository writing unit, the students will use informational text in the classroom to identify text features of this genre. At home, please discuss text features in informational text with your fourth grader. For example: What is the purpose of bold words? Why do books have a Table of Contents? What does this specific picture illustrate?

 

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Reading Read for

Thirty Minutes

Letter from North America and South America due

Read for

Thirty Minutes

Letter from Europe, Africa, and Asia due

Read for

Thirty Minutes

Letter from Australia and Australia due

Read for Thirty Minutes
Math Homelink 2.1 Homelink 2.2 Homelink 2.3 Math Homework Due

 

 

 

 

October 2nd, 2015

Peek at the Week ~ Week of October 5th

Miss Wejman’s

Peek at the Week

Week of October 5th-9th

 

Science: Developing and using models

This week’s investigations will center on the question: How do weathered rock pieces move from one place to another? The geologist will begin the week with modeling land with a stream table. They will use different earth material and water to observe what happens to land material in standard water occurrences as well as a flood. From their observations, they will identify different formations with the appropriate vocabulary such as valley, canyon, river mouth, alluvial fan, and delta. In addition to identifying the landforms they will also identify erosion, deposition, and sediments. They will model the process of erosion. By the end of the week, the geologist will know the difference between deposition and erosion. Ask your geologist about the different investigations that took place in science this week.

 

Math: Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles

Because Monday’s perimeter lesson is the last of Unit 1, the students will be assessed on Wednesday and Thursday. With our library time breaking up our math block, we will have the open response portion of the test on Wednesday and the concepts portion on Thursday. Concepts included on Thursday’s test include place value, rounding and comparing numbers, word problems, estimation, adding and subtracting multiple digit numbers, converting yards to feet, identifying right angles, and finding the perimeter of a rectangle. If your fourth grader needs any practice with a certain math skill, please let me know. Tuesday will be a review day. In the open response problem, the fourth grader will analyze how two students subtract multiple digit numbers and will explain their strategies.

 

Social Studies: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text.

As the students are becoming acquainted to the United States people, government, and economy, they will be using context clues to identify unfamiliar words. When your child reads an unfamiliar word at home, encourage him or her to use context clues to define the word. By the end of the school year, the fourth graders should be automatic in using this skill to define unfamiliar words.

 

 

 

Reading: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

Groups will meet to discuss the plot of their guided reading book. As they discuss the plot, they should be able to identify the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. When discussing books with your children at home, use this plot language. Through the plot discussion, every fourth grader should be able to identify the theme of the text. A theme is a lesson that we can learn from the text. Many of the fourth graders are confusing genre with theme. Please discuss theme with your fourth grader at home. From there, fourth graders should be able to give text evidence to support their ideas of theme. On Monday, the students are taking a reading assessment. This assessment tests each fourth grader on his or reading comprehension. Nothing could have been done to prepare for this assessment.

 

Writing: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling while writing

After spending the first four weeks of fourth grade collecting ideas, using excellent word choice, incorporating dialogue, and incorporating elements of plot in our narratives, we are now ready to write the final draft of our writing. On Monday, the students discussed the correct use of paragraph breaks. On Tuesday, the students will be given a rubric. The rubric states the requirements for the narrative final draft. Throughout the week, the writers will be editing and revising their writing to create a final draft that will be due on Friday, October, 9th. In addition to editing their own writing, they will also peer edit.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Math Homelink 1.13 Math Homework Due
Reading Read for 30 minutes Read for 30 minutes

Letters from North America and South America due

Read for 30 minutes Letters from Europe, Africa, and Asia due Read for 30 minutes Letters from Australia and Antractica due Read for minutes

 

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