Ms. Wejman

December 13th, 2013

Peek at the Week ~ Week of December 16th

Miss Wejman’s

Peek at the Week

Week of December 16th-20th

 

Math: Understand concepts of angle and measure.

Throughout the week, lessons will focus on measuring angles. First, the students will correlate the time on the clock with angle measurement. With using a clock as a model, the students will use a full circle protractor.  On Wednesday, the students will measure with a half-circle protractor.  To aid in this important math skill, it would be valuable for every student to bring a protractor to school to use during math.  As the students are measuring angles, they will also identify angles that are acute, obtuse, and reflex. We will end the week with a math game/exploration hour and half focusing on division and geometry.  Math homework will be due on Thursday this week. 

 

Science: Describe and compare types of energy including light, heat, sound, electrical, and mechanical.

Since we spent an extra two days last week learning about the history of electricity, we were not able to begin our study on telegraphs.  Because of the change in last week’s lesson plans, we will learn the history and model a telegraph this week.  To conclude our unit in electricity, the students will also use their schema to identify correct and incorrect circuits.

 

Social Studies: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text.

This week, the students will begin to learn about the Midwest.  As they are skimming the text, they will use context clues to identify unfamiliar words.  When your child is asking you what a word means, tell them to use the context clues to make an educated guess of what the word could mean. 

 

 

 

 

Reading: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

As the students meet in guided reading groups, they will be sharing their inferences.  The fourth graders are becoming better at making inferences and differentiating between information explicitly and implicitly stated in the text.

 

Writing: Writing opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. 

Throughout the month of December, the fourth graders have been reading articles that present some sort of debate.  They will continue to read these articles this week.  Because of all the practice they have had, they will now be using the persuasive rubric to grade their writing.  On Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday they will read the article and write their opinion on the topic supporting their opinion with explicit evidence stated in the text. This writing will be graded using the persuasive essay rubric. The teacher will model this on Monday and on Tuesday the students will practice writing the persuasive essays with their groups. 

 

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Reading

Read The Life and Times of the Ant

 

 

 

Tic Tac toe Sheet Due

Math

Study Link 6.5

Study Link 6.6

Study Link 6.7

 

 

 

 

December 13th, 2013

Homework ~ Week of December 16th

Monday, December 16th

This week for homework, read The Life and Times of the Ant by Charles Micucci.  By Friday, you should complete three tic-tac-toe activities in your homework notebook.  At the top of each page, you should write the date and title of the story. 

Use each vocabulary word on pages 348 and 349 in a sentence.  Each sentence should have at least eight words in it.  Read The Dove and The Ant. What moral did you learn from this fable? Answer in five or more sentences. Answer the stop and think question on page 360 in five or more sentences.
Answer the Stop and Think questions found on page 359. Answer in five or more sentences. Complete the graphic organizer found on page 351. Answer the Stop and Think question on page 356 in five or more sentences. 
Complete the text to self activity on page 369. Write a letter to Miss Wejman about this story.  Your letter must be written in correct format in five or more sentences. Answer the essential question in five or more sentences.

 

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